Research

Bringing the Leave No Trace Message to State Parks

Boulder, CO: The U.S. system of national parks has been called America's “best idea.” There’s no doubt about their popularity—overall visits continue to grow strongly. For all the success of that national parks enjoy, however, state parks see more than double the number of annual visits. National parks broke the previous year’s record in 2016, hosting 331 million visits . In that same year state parks hosted an astonishing 730+ million annual visits. Photo: Young visitors at North Dakota's Turtle River State Park learn about Leave No Trace. For the Leave No Trace Center for Outdoor...

Colorado Study Examines Attitudes About Using Undesignated Trails

Boulder, CO: The city of Boulder, Colorado's Open Space and Mountain Parks (OSMP) department oversees 45,000 acres of public lands, including about 150 miles of trails. That might sound like an expansive amount of terrain for a city with a population of about 100,000 people, but the trails are teeming. Popular with both tourists and locals, the trails see well over 5 million outings each year—the Chautauqua area alone attracts more than 300,000 annual visits. Recently, OSMP officials decided to partner with the Leave No Trace Center for Outdoor Ethics to better understand...

Leave No Trace Seven Principles Rap

Boulder, CO: The member-driven Leave No Trace Center for Outdoor Ethics protects the outdoors by teaching people to enjoy it responsibly. It is the most widely accepted outdoor ethics program used on public lands. Through targeted education, research and outreach, the Center ensures the long-term health of our natural world. One way we reach the public is through the creative freedom of our Subaru/Leave No Trace Traveling Trainers. The Subaru/Leave No Trace Traveling Trainer program consists of four teams of two educators that travel across the country in Subarus teaching people how to...

Yielding 101

Oklahoma City, OK: Do you know the yield triangle? In this video you can find out more about the seventh Leave No Trace Principle, Be Considerate of Others . We all enjoy the outdoors and even though we may do different activities to enjoy the outdoors we can still work together and share our outdoor spaces so that we can all have a great time. Please be considerate of others when you hit the trails. The yield triangle is an easy and effective technique to enjoy the trails with everyone. The first rule of the yield triangle is that all stock and horse users have the right of way at all times...

Skills Series: Invasive Species & Cleaning Gear

Austin, TX: The fourth principle of Leave No Trace is to Leave What You Find . In this addition of the Leave No Trace Skills Series we talk about how to stop the spread of invasive species through the cleaning of outdoor gear. What is an invasive species you ask? An invasive species is non-native (or alien) to the ecosystem under consideration whose introduction causes or is likely to cause environmental harm. Invasive species can be plants, animals, and other organisms (e.g., microbes). Human actions are the primary means of invasive species introductions. On Invasivespeciesinfo.gov you can...

Fighting Graffiti in the Red River Gorge

Moab, UT: Last October a team of Subaru Leave No Trace Traveling Trainers visited the Red River Gorge National Geologic Area near Stanton, Kentucky to conduct a Hot Spot Revisit. This means that the Red River Gorge National Geologic Area was deemed "loved to death" and the agency that manages the area reached out to Leave No Trace for a Hot Spot. While we visited the area we conduct studies and try solve land use problems so that we can enjoy this special place now and forever. One of the biggest problems that the Red River Gorge National Geologic Area faces is graffiti. Leave No Trace fights...

Winter Camping Tips

Yucca Valley, CA: The first day of winter is officially December 21, but for many parts of the country winter is already here. The cold weather and wet or snowy conditions should not stop anyone from enjoying the great outdoors. Here at Leave No Trace our Traveling Trainers camp over 250 nights a year and the winter does not stop them, so do not let it stop you. Here are five easy steps to staying warm! Step 1. Check the weather! This is something that we always encourage no matter what the season, but it is especially important when the temperatures can drop dramatically. Once you know...

#GivingTuesday - 5 Reasons Why You Should Support Leave No Trace

San Francisco, CA: This #GivingTuesday, we reflect on why Leave No Trace is so important. As Subaru/Leave No Trace Traveling Trainers, we have had the opportunity to visit some of the country’s most pristine natural treasures. From cool, clear mountain streams to arid, resilient desert landscapes, spending time in our public lands inspires a deep sense of connection, humility and stewardship in us. Protecting these special places is more important than ever. As we travel and camp across the country, we’ve witnessed the tragic consequences that result from uninformed visitors. We have seen...

Respect Wildlife: Build A Bat House

Monroe, LA: Did you know that the last week of October is Bat Week? We were in the Daniel Boone National Forest where the Red River Gorge is located this year and they were celebrating by building bat houses. The sixth Leave No Trace principle is to Respect Wildlife . When we talk about respecting wildlife we encourage: Observe wildlife from a distance. Do not follow or approach them. Never feed animals. Feeding wildlife damages their health, alters natural behaviors, and exposes them to predators and other dangers. Protect wildlife and your food by storing rations and trash securely. Control...

Do You Know The Thumb Trick?

Slade, KY: Seeing wildlife is one of the pleasures of the great outdoors. We must remember that when we see wildlife we are visitors in their home. It is important to respect wildlife. Principle 6 teaches us a few things about treating wild animals with respect and here are some of those tips: Observe wildlife from a distance. Do not follow or approach them. Never feed animals. Feeding wildlife damages their health, alters natural behaviors, and exposes them to predators and other dangers. Protect wildlife and your food by storing rations and trash securely. Control pets at all times, or...

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