Traveling Trainers

Any information pertaining to the Subaru/Leave No Trace Traveling Trainer program

Fluffing the Duff: A Backcountry Camping Skill

Ocala, FL: Having a grasp of backcountry camping skills is just as important as knowing about the area you are planning to visit. This week the Subaru/Leave No Trace Traveling Trainers share how to help a campsite revive itself after a night or two of camping. What is this skill? Read on to learn more. Soil compression can lead to site creep ; the expansion of a campsite over time due to soil compression and the removal of organic litter. Fluffing the duff is a skill that helps a campsite to rebound after the compression effects from a tent. Take some time after...

Out Here, It's Trash: Apple Cores, Orange Peels, and Other "Natural" Items

Dallas, TX: When talking to people at booths and in workshops, we're often told that one of the most surprising things they learned about Leave No Trace is not throwing or leaving "natural" food items, like apple cores, banana or orange peels, on the trail or out in nature. "It's natural", "It'll help the wildlife", "It's organic", "It's good for the soil", we've heard them all. Chances are you've done it, we know we did before we learned how destructive it really is. It seems like common sense to those who are educated in it and yet, not so common for everyone else. We hope to provide that...

A Hot Spot to Protect Fayette County, GA

Peach Tree City, GA : Have you ever heard of a town that commutes by Golf Cart? This is a reality in Fayette County, Georgia where residents have access to over 90 miles of multi-use Greenways. Walkers, runners, cyclists, and even riders of golf carts utilize these paths every day of the year to get around town and to access the counties green spaces. These nature areas of Fayette County are the focus of a 2016 Leave No Trace Hot Spot. For one full week the Subaru/Leave No Trace Traveling Trainers worked hand-in-hand with the Southern Conservation Trust , who manages the green spaces in...

Do You Know The Thumb Trick?

Slade, KY: Seeing wildlife is one of the pleasures of the great outdoors. We must remember that when we see wildlife we are visitors in their home. It is important to respect wildlife. Principle 6 teaches us a few things about treating wild animals with respect and here are some of those tips: Observe wildlife from a distance. Do not follow or approach them. Never feed animals. Feeding wildlife damages their health, alters natural behaviors, and exposes them to predators and other dangers. Protect wildlife and your food by storing rations and trash securely. Control pets at all times, or...

How to Keep a Bug-Free Campsite

San Antonio, TX: We love bugs. They play a crucial role in ecosystems around the world and their importance cannot be understated. However, many of us can also think back to camp experiences where we could have done with a few less bugs. Sometimes these swarms and infestations are out of our hands, as is the case with mosquito season. Other times, keeping a bug-free campsite is easily within our control. Keeping your campsite bug-free can be an easy way to ensure an enjoyable outdoor experience. Keep Food Scraps off the Ground Patrol your kitchen area for food scraps and pick them up promptly...

19th Annual Catskill Ice Festival - New Paltz, NY

The Subaru/Leave No Trace Traveling Trainers are excited to be on site at the 19th Annual Catskill Ice Climbing Festival. Come find our outreach booth to test your Leave No Trace knowledge! The Trainers will be on site providing Leave No Trace information and will even be out at the crags, climbing and educating about minimum impact ice climbing techniques.

Leave What You Find - Gates

Sugar Grove, VA: Principle 4 of the Leave No Trace Seven Principles is: Leave What You Find. When we speak about Principle 4 it usually pertains to: Preserve the past: examine, but do not touch cultural or historic structures and artifacts. Leave rocks, plants and other natural objects as you find them. Avoid introducing or transporting non-native species. Do not build structures, furniture, or dig trenches. But it also means to leave gates as you find them, which usually means to close them. In this video the Subaru/Leave No Trace Traveling Trainers are hiking in the Grayson Highlands of...

Don't Bust the Crust - How You Can Protect The Desert Ground

Moab, UT: Biological soil crust, also known as cryptobiotic soil, is the foundation of desert plant life. This black, knobby crust is made up of many different living organisms and plays a vital role in maintaining the desert eco-system. However, this sensitive soil is extremely fragile and can take decades to grow. Even a footstep can damage the crust for decades, having lasting impacts on the desert environment. So next time you're out exploring the Southwest, please stick to trails, especially if you on a bike or OHV. If traveling overland while hiking or canyoneering, use a route that...

Trail Benefits of Llama Pack Stock

San Antonio, TX: Llama in North America The llama, native to the high puna of the South American Andes, is a relative newcomer to North America. The importation of llamas to North America in the 1800s was only common for zoo and exotic animal exhibits. But in the early 1970’s a few private breeders began recognizing the unique qualities of the llama as an alternative livestock for pet/companion animals and pack animals. Market momentum began to build and by the late seventies, two year waiting lists were commonplace for most breeders. Now, the U.S. llama herd now numbers in...

Easy How To Leave What You Find

Boone, NC: It can be hard to Leave What You Find sometimes. When we enjoy the outdoors sometimes we find cool stuff. The Leave No Trace Center for Outdoor Ethics recommends that it is best for nature and for future generations if we leave the cool things that we find where we found them. One thing that is easy to leave what you find is invasive species. Invasive species are plants, animals, or pathogens that are non-native (or alien) to the ecosystem under consideration and whose introduction causes or is likely to cause harm. There are many of these around the country and for more...

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