Traveling Trainers

Any information pertaining to the Subaru/Leave No Trace Traveling Trainer program

Campfire Tips

For some campers, a campfire is essential for a campout. A campfire provides light, heat, smores, and can also be an inspiring sight on a campout. Leave No Trace is not against fires in the backcountry or frontcountry. Leave No Trace recommends the responsible use of campfires, so people can enjoy them and to minimize campfire impacts. Thanks to warm fabrics, headlamps, and camp stoves, fires are not as necessary as they once were. There are a lot of ways to enjoy a campfire without leaving an impact on the land. Some options for a minimum impact fire are: to not have one if you do not need...

Free Leave No Trace Lesson Plans and Information!

Outdoor educators are always looking for new and interactive ways to teach Leave No Trace. On the Leave No Trace website, educators can use the Concepts and Plans for Teaching Leave No Trace link. These links provide information on how to setup the lesson, facilitate the lesson, and the follow up discussion. These quick and easy lesson plans help educators to teach a different Leave No Trace concept. Our Natural World Plan Ahead and Prepare Travel and Camp on Durable Surfaces Pack it in, Pack it Out Leave What You Find Minimize Use and Impact of Fire Respect Wildlife Be Considerate of Other...

A Conversation on Ethics

What does the word 'ethic' mean to you?! The Leave No Trace program teaches skills to enjoy the outdoors safely and responsibly. More importantly though, Leave No Trace aims to impart an ethic - a compelling outdoor ethic that will hopefully guide those who enjoy the out of doors in making positive decisions. An ethic is defined in many ways. The dictionary lends us this definition: a theory or system of moral values. As Subaru Leave No Trace Traveling Trainers, we have heard several definitions of the word 'ethic'. Some are more suitable than others and some are completely right on. Here are...

Principle Blog Series: Part 7 of 7-Be Considerate of Other Visitors

Be Considerate of Other Visitors is the 7 th of Seven Leave No Trace Principles . It is important to regard fellow visitors and respect the quality of their experience. An easy way to do this is by following the yield triangle on a multi-use trail. The above picture illustrates this concept. Bikers yield to hikers, while both hikers and bikers yield to horses. By practicing use of the yield triangle, user conflicts could be minimized in recreational areas. Nature is a finite resource, not infinite. Be considerate so that everyone can enjoy! Here are some more pointers on ways to Be...

Principle Blog Series: Part 6 of 7-Respect Wildlife

Respect Wildlife is the 6 th of Seven Leave No Trace Principles . Humans can unknowingly cause distress to animals by exhibiting the following behaviors: cutting trail switch backs, getting too close, leaving behind food and trash, and being too loud (except in bear/mountain lion country). When entering the natural world, we are in essence entering the home of wild animals. Some ideas on ways we can respect wildlife are: Observe wildlife from a distance. Do not follow or approach them. Never feed animals. Feeding wildlife damages their health, alters natural behaviors, and exposes them to...

Principle Blog Series: Part 5 of 7-Minimize Campfire Impacts

Minimize Campfire Impacts is the 5 th of 7 Leave No Trace Principles . If you close your eyes and think about some of your earliest camping experiences, there is a good chance that a campfire is included in your reflection. It is important to note that Leave No Trace is not against campfires, but please be aware of responsible practices. Some other points to consider about Minimizing Campfire Impacts are: Campfires can cause lasting impacts to the backcountry. Use a lightweight stove for cooking and enjoy a candle lantern for light. Where fires are permitted, use established fire rings, fire...

Bigfoot's Morning Routine

Las Vegas, NV: We were lucky enough to catch our mascot, Bigfoot, one morning this fall in Nevada. How does this elusive creature manage to always Leave No Trace? Check out our footage of his morning routine, captured early one morning in the desert where he seemed to be enjoying a brilliant fall sunrise. Want to be like Bigfoot? Us too! Here are three things we do every morning to Leave No Trace like the big guy. Strain dishwater, throw away food scraps and dispose of our dishwater according to local regulations. Sometimes, campgrounds provide drains or special sinks for dishwater. Some...

Mad About Our Latest Hot Spot

Wytheville, VA: There's a fair amount of indoor climbing in central Ohio - but what about outdoor climbing? The dolemite cliffs along the Mad River just outside of Springfield have been an illicit climbing spot for the last two decades, but they are illicit no more. About 40 acres on the south side of the river have been turned into the Mad River Gorge and Nature Preserve, and the Clark County Parks District has plans to add about 60 acres to the property. Team East Central recently conducted a Hot Spot in the area, and found a budding community of climbers, locals, and land...

Before the Last Leaves Fall

Springfield, OH : The countdown to Halloween is finally here, and many in the nation are in a rush to enjoy themselves before the snows come. But this time of year, school is back in full swing, work is making up for summer absences, and social calendars are starting to fill up fast. To make sure you're making the most of your fall, here are three outdoors challenges to complete before the last leaves fall: Greet the Sun As the leaves and the land change with the seasons, one of the more intentional ways you can get outside is to sit and watch the sunrise...

20,000 Calories a Day: How to Help Wildlife in Autumn

Yosemite National Park, CA: Ever feel really hungry after a long hike? Playing outside does burn a lot of calories, but did you know that black bears need to consume 20,000 calories a day in late summer and early fall to put on enough weight to survive the winter? That would be a lot of camp stove dinners for us! Fall is prime hiking and camping season for us, but, for the wildlife who live where we play, it’s crunch time, both literally (many animals chow down in autumn to prepare for winter) and figuratively (many animals don’t have a lot of time before the first snow). Heading outside this...

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