Seven Principles

What Should be Stored Inside of a Bear Canister?

Harrisonburg, VA: It may still be winter but we are starting to plan for our spring backpacking trips. Spring is a wonderful time of the year to get outdoors but also a really important time to respect wildlife. Bears will be waking from their winter hibernation and no doubt, will be looking for food and anything that may smell like it. Bear canisters are an easy to way to protect bears from eating our human food. Feeding bears (even accidentally) leads to habituation, and habituation with food conditioning leads to relocation or even euthanasia; just like the infamous saying goes, “A fed...

Learn Multi-use Trail Responsibility

Boulder, CO: Do you like to get out on the trail? There are many different activities that use trails, such as: dog walking, hiking, trail running, horseback riding, and mountain biking. In this video we talk about the importance of being considerate of other visitors and traveling on durable surfaces . Check it out: Travel Well, Amanda and Greg - Subaru/Leave No Trace Traveling Trainer Team East Central Leave No Trace’s Amanda Neiman and Greg Smith are part of the 2017 Subaru/Leave No Trace Traveling Trainer Program that provides free, mobile education to...

Fighting Graffiti in the Red River Gorge

Moab, UT: Last October a team of Subaru Leave No Trace Traveling Trainers visited the Red River Gorge National Geologic Area near Stanton, Kentucky to conduct a Hot Spot Revisit. This means that the Red River Gorge National Geologic Area was deemed "loved to death" and the agency that manages the area reached out to Leave No Trace for a Hot Spot. While we visited the area we conduct studies and try solve land use problems so that we can enjoy this special place now and forever. One of the biggest problems that the Red River Gorge National Geologic Area faces is graffiti. Leave No Trace fights...

Leave No Trace Ski Tips

Park City, UT: Ski season is here, are you ready to enjoy your world and Leave No Trace in the snow? Here are a few tips and tricks to remember the Leave No Trace Seven Principles while having fun on the mountain. It is easy to Plan Ahead and Prepare for your day on the mountain. Always remember to check the weather so that you are warm enough. It is also important to carry a trail map of the runs on the mountain to make sure you are skiing or snowboarding at your ability. Also remember to check your equipment to have a safe day on the mountain. When you enjoy the outdoors in the snow...

Preventing the Posthole

Lake Placid, NY: Getting out for a hike on the trails in the winter time has a lot of perks; less people, warm jackets, soft snow, and a warm thermos. As you prepare for that wonderful hike into the snowy mountains though, will you be prepared to prevent your posthole? What is a, “posthole” anyway? Well, when walking thru the snow our boot prints sink deep into the snow creating big holes, know as postholes. Traveling on a trail that has big ruts and postholes is inefficient and dangerous for ankles. This is why snowshoes and skis are so important when out on the trails. These pieces of gear...

Camping at the Red River Gorge

Park City, UT: Last October the Leave No Trace Center for Outdoor Ethics partnered with the Daniel Boone National Forest to raise awareness about Leave No Trace at the Red River Gorge National Geologic Area near Stanton, Kentucky. The Subaru Leave No Trace Traveling Trainers spent a week at the National Forest learning about the area, the people who enjoy the area and the rangers who protect the area. This video educates the public about how to camp at the Red River Gorge: Travel Well, Amanda and Greg - Subaru/Leave No Trace Traveling Trainer Team East Central ...

How Far is 200 Feet?

Stone Ridge, NY: When was the last time you were hiking and you felt the call of nature? Using the “facili-trees” is a normal part of being in the outdoors. However, do you know how far from water sources, trails, and campsites you should go before answering the call? Leave No Trace recommends walking 200 feet to reduce the chances of contaminating water sources and trails. Not sure exactly how far 200 feet is? Luckily we have a simple trick you can use; 200 feet is approximately 70 big steps! Walk in a mostly straight line away from those water sources and trails to reach your defecation...

How to Leave No Trace in the Frontcountry

Los Angeles, CA: Leave No Trace is not just for campers, backpackers, climbers and other outdoor enthusiasts, it is for everyone. If you go outside Leave No Trace is for you. Leave No Trace in the frontcountry focuses on places with designated places for trash and bathrooms, one good example of a frontcountry space is your local park. Check out this video to learn more about how to Leave No Trace in the frontcountry: Travel Well, Amanda and Greg - Subaru/Leave No Trace Traveling Trainer Team East Central Leave No Trace’s Amanda Neiman and Greg Smith are part of...

Respecting Wildlife When Least Expected

Glacier National Park, MT: It’s so easy to say, “ respect wildlife ” when heading out into the wilderness. Most of us want to keep wildlife wild and respect their home, by practicing Leave No Trace. Sometimes though, wildlife happens. They aren’t always seeking us out but we are visitors in their home and they are used to romping around where they please. This is exactly what happened to Steph and I this past August while visiting Glacier National Park in Montana. Between our time educating and sharing knowledge with the public, we have been very fortunate to explore the places we visit. In...

Winter Camping Tips

Yucca Valley, CA: The first day of winter is officially December 21, but for many parts of the country winter is already here. The cold weather and wet or snowy conditions should not stop anyone from enjoying the great outdoors. Here at Leave No Trace our Traveling Trainers camp over 250 nights a year and the winter does not stop them, so do not let it stop you. Here are five easy steps to staying warm! Step 1. Check the weather! This is something that we always encourage no matter what the season, but it is especially important when the temperatures can drop dramatically. Once you know...

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