Seven Principles

Wilderness Words: Broadcasting

Snowshoe, WV : When you’re cooking dinner or washing dishes at camp, you’re going to have dirty water. Broadcasting is a quick way to dispose of that grey water, dispersing the impact across a wide area. Just strain, stroll and scatter! Leave No Trace's Joe Besl and Joe Creaghead are part of the 2018 Subaru/Leave No Trace Traveling Trainer Program that provides free, mobile education to communities across the country. Proud partners of this program include Subaru of America, REI, Eagles...

5 Tips for Responsibly Visiting Parks During the Shutdown

Frostburg, MD: While we’re bummed the government is shut down, we’re glad that many of our national parks and other public lands have remained open to the public. The trouble is, almost all park workers are furloughed, and facilities are locked. If you can’t wait for the shutdown to end before visiting, check out our five hacks for how to responsibly visit parks during the shutdown. 1. Have a Poop Plan! Facilities locked, remember? All of a sudden, even day users need to be aware of how to dispose of their (ahem) human waste properly. You can “’go’...

How To Leave No Trace While Caving

Carlsbad, New Mexico: Caves are incredibly unique and beautiful natural ecosystems. They offer a look into geologic history, specially adapted wildlife, and exploration in a challenging and foreign environment. However, these places can be extremely fragile and sensitive to human impact, making it super important to practice Leave No Trace. Here are some specific Leave No Trace tips to consider for a trip underground. 1. A trip into a cave system will take considerably more planning and preparation than a regular recreation trip. Consider joining a grotto to...

Take the 3 Skills in 3(ish) Minutes Challenge!

Bryson City, NC : Want to take your camping game up a notch or three? Take our 3 Skills in 3 Minutes Challenge! Below are three of our favorite skills videos from the past couple of years that will help you enjoy your next adventure more while leaving less of a trace! Skill #1: Hammock Camping Skill #2: Build a Better Fire Skill #3: How to Poop in the Woods There, wasn't that easy? Now share your new skills with a friend on your next trip! Enjoy Your World, and Leave No Trace Jessie and Matt Leave No Trace's Jessie...

Leaving No Trace in the Boundary Waters Canoe Area Wilderness

Duluth, MN: Like many outdoor enthusiasts, we have been itching to get to the Boundary Waters for years. Lucky for us, our path as Traveling Trainers allowed us to spend four days paddling through this unique wilderness area. With around 250,000 visitors annually, the Boundary Waters Canoe Wilderness Area is one of the most visited wildernesses in the country. Visitors to the Boundary Waters portage and paddle their way through 1.1 million acres and over 1,000 lakes. The Boundary Waters is a place that preserves the wilderness spirit and experience for all to enjoy, and it...

Wilderness Words: Carr

Georgetown, Colorado: Traveling trainers are always talking about their cars. But today, we want to talk about the other type of carr. A carr is a variety of wetland characterized by low woody plants like willows and alders. It's like a swamp, but with shrubs instead of trees. When hiking through a carr, stay on the designated trail, even if your boots get wet. And they will get wet. Learn more in the video below: Leave No Trace's Joe and Joe are part of the 2018 Subaru/Leave No Trace Traveling Trainer Program that provides free, mobile education to...

Raft right this summer

Boulder, Colorado: It’s another scorching summer, and that local lazy river is looking pretty nice right now. But before you head to the creek with your floats and your friends, here are a few things to keep in mind… Map the route: Plan a route and locate a few existing, durable trails that lead to the water. By knowing the area, you can find exit routes that avoid stepping on creekside plants and further eroding stream banks. Check to see if you’re passing through residential areas or past busy trails, and keep the volume down along the...

How to Camp in Hot Weather

The dog days of summer are almost upon us, and that means two things. First, IT’S STILL SUMMER CAMPING SEASON! And, second, it’s HOT. Don’t let the heat keep you from taking advantage of summer weekends – read on for Traveling Trainer tips (we are full-time campers, after all) on how to have a cool trip no matter what the mercury says. Always pumped to find block ice on the road! 1. Block ice – If there’s anything that has revolutionized our #roadlife experience, it’s been discovering block ice. Block ice is large, solid rectangles of ice, usually sold in 10-pound...

Wilderness Words: Humus

Littleton, CO: Let's talk about humus. Humus is the dark organic material in fertile soils, full of microbes that can break down human waste. It's the perfect environment if you need to dig a cathole. Hummus, on the other hand, is a Middle Eastern chickpea spread. It's not the right environment for digging a cathole. Learn more about the difference between humus and hummus in the video below. Leave No Trace's Joe and Joe are part of the 2018 Subaru/Leave No Trace Traveling Trainer Program that provides free, mobile education to communities across the...

Our 5 Most Common Litter Sightings

Elkhart, IN: Living on the road and traveling campground to campground, we unfortunately see a great deal of litter. Whether we are in the mountains of New Hampshire or the beaches of North Carolina, there are a few types of trash we always find. Can you guess what the five most common types of trash we see are? 1. Orange Peels Orange peels can take as long as two years to decompose. There is a common misconception that “natural trash” such as orange peels, banana peels, apple cores, and shells from nuts and seeds are okay to leave behind on the trail, in campgrounds, or in...

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