Research

Why We Should All Pack Out Our Dog's Poo

High Falls, NY: Have you ever wondered why it is alright for bears and other wildlife to poo in the woods but not acceptable for our dogs? A bears diet consists mainly of natural plants and berries, while our pet's waste is considered unnatural. Dog food is derived from processed foods which we wouldn't typically find in nature. According to the CDC, or Center for Disease Control one days worth of dog waste can contain several billion fecal bacteria along with Giardia, hookworm, and tapeworms. If our pet waste reaches waterways, it can be harmful to other animals, wildlife, and even humans...

Does a bear poop in the woods? Of course! But if you do, bury it or pack it out.

Guadalupe Mountains National Park, TX: This week we camped in the remote and gorgeous backcountry of the Guadalupe Mountains; fall was in the air, the leaves were vibrant colors, and we had starry nights. Unfortunately, we found human waste near our backcountry campsite in the park. We have seen far too many improper human waste disposal impacts as we travel around the country as Subaru/Leave No Trace Traveling Trainers; from toilet paper flowers, poop with simply with a rock placed on top of it, to poop just off the side on the trail. The negative aesthetic issue alone is often too much, but...

Minimize Waste to Maximize Space

Minneapolis, MN--Dastardly trash flitters across the parking lot as its potential captor follows in hot pursuit. Every gust of wind helps the debris slink between cars and roll around light posts as it takes aim for a precise exit by way of the storm drain. Once within the dark passages of the drain, the trash will forever be on the run, freely able to wreak havoc on the earth: baiting marine life, contaminating our water, and littering our shorelines. These trash escapees are ever slipping from our overloaded hands, shopping bags, and car doors--they must be better confined, barred within...

Rock Climbing and Group Use

Maple Canyon, UT: Climbing is a popular sport in the US with over 9 million people participating in it each year, according to Climbing Magazine. With millions of people getting out to climb on public and private land, rock climbers can significantly degrade the areas that they love. Impacts at climbing areas range from braided trails around crags, litter, improper disposal of human and pet waste, disturbed raptor nests, and poor crag etiquette. Climbing in large groups can be more fun and safer, but also leads to a greater impact and more care should be taken to minimize impacts at the crags...

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