Education

Klamath Falls Recap

In A Sand County Almanac , Aldo Leopold wrote that “the land ethic simply enlarges the boundaries of the community to include soils, waters, plants, and animals, or collectively: the land.” Maybe it’s time for us to flip that idea on its head, and think of bringing Leave No Trace Outdoor Ethics from our backcountry into a community-based approach, a goal the Center has been focusing on over the past few years. By addressing environmental stewardship across different components of a community – land managers, schools, Scout troops, volunteer groups, and community leaders – we can...

Leave No Trace Effectiveness Research Begins in Wyoming

The Leave No Trace Center for Outdoor Ethics, in conjunction with Wyoming State Parks, Historic Sites and Trails and Colorado State University, is undertaking research at three different state parks in Wyoming in 2012. The intent of the research is to explore the potential efficacy of Leave No Trace in state park settings. There are currently over 6,600 state parks in the U.S. with an annual visitation of 740 million. While the Center has worked with several individual state park units across the country, there has not been widespread adoption of Leave No Trace by state parks. According to...

Whose Land is this Anyways?

Fortunately for outdoor enthusiasts in the U.S. there are a lot of places to recreate. From lands managed by the federal government to state land to local open spaces and parks, there is no shortage of elbowroom for those interested in spending time outside. Finding places to hike, camp or fish only requires a quick search on the Internet. However, what is often more elusive to recreationists is finding out who manages those lands used for recreation. There are five prominent federal land management agencies in the U.S. that provide recreational opportunities of all kinds: USDA Forest...

Leave No Trace Club Attends Trainer Course

Interlake High School of Bellevue, Washington is home to the very first Leave No Trace Club. This group of talented and passionate students came together a few years back and have been practicing and advocating Leave No Trace throughout their community. The Leave No Trace club has made it a point to educate their fellow high school students, as well as other local schools, on the Leave No Trace principles. They have also branched out to other areas of their local community, participating in several service projects and attending events to spread awareness of Leave No Trace. The Leave No Trace...

Louisiana State Advocates Focus on Youth Outreach

Peggy Reily and Barrett Kennedy have dedicated themselves to promoting Leave No Trace across the country. They were introduced to Leave No Trace with wilderness volunteers doing a service trip in conjunction with a Leave No Trace trainer course in Yosemite. Struck by the curriculum, the pair went on to take a Master Educator course.. In 2010, the two became traveling trainers. Now Louisiana State Advocates, Peggy and Barrett are focusing their efforts towards children throughout the state with goals to expand the Leave No Trace education to untapped avenues for youth outreach. During their...

Minnesota Master Naturalists

Before leaving Minnesota, the Leave No Trace e-tour had the incredible opportunity to present two sessions at the Minnesota Master Naturalist Conference. This group of high-quality volunteers and professionals are dedicated to the three-part mission of Explore, Teach, Conserve. The Minnesota Master Naturalists work with the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources and University of Minnesota Extension to ensure that people across the state have opportunities to get outdoors, learn about their specific biomes, and participate in some fun programs and volunteer opportunities. During our two...

Twin Cities Travels

/*--> */ On the edge of the Twin Cities in Minnesota, the e-tour team got a chance to work with some outstanding students from Simley High School in Inver Grove Heights, MN. Along with their dedicated teacher, these students are helping work with the development of a brand-new nature center and learning about the outdoors and Leave No Trace along the way. During a day-long workshop, we got to talk about all seven principles, some techniques, and how to message the ideas to others both at their school and in the community. Drawing on their study in the classroom of different biomes and...

Mines & Pines

In an area once dominated by mine pits, the Leave No Trace e-tour team visited with an inspired and inspiring group of high school students to talk about Leave No Trace, protecting the outdoors, and really making an impact in your community. Along with the S.A.L.T., or Service Adventure Learning Team, from Crosby-Ironton High Shool, we headed out on a "Mines & Pines" event where we camped, talked about issues the students cared about, and got to enjoy some great outdoor recreation. Not content to simply master the skills of Leave No Trace, these students approach both their peers at...

One of 10,000

Bears were on the loose In the Land of 10,000 Lakes, the Leave No Trace e-tour set up on just one lake this Monday -- Lake Bemidji. Visiting a beautiful town, the First City on the Mississippi, we got a chance to go to Lake Bemidji State Park to work with a stellar group of high school students. They were joining us from Voyageurs Expeditionary High School in town, a cool school where some of these students will later this year have the opportunity to take the Leave No Trace knowledge and skills they learned on Monday with them on trips to the Badlands of the Dakotas as well as Florida! Each...

Why Leave No Trace is important to Expedition Mississippi:

Guest Blog from the folks at Expedition Mississippi : To make a long answer short, WE NEED THE ENVIRONMENT MORE THAN IT NEEDS US AND OUR POSTERITY WILL NEED IT EVEN MORE THAN WE DO. We rely on the environment more than we realize. It surrounds us 24/7, 365 days a year. The environment produces the air we breathe, the water we drink and the food that we eat . We are just a small part of the intricate system that makes up the whole. Yet in today’s society many forget that. We forget that we are not alone, that there are other species on this earth with which we co-exist. We often imagine...

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