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Feb 19, 2015

Joshua Tree National Park, CA: The Subaru Legacy Winter Getaway event is being held amongst the backdrop of Joshua trees, granite cliffs, and endless sunshine this week. Subaru is hosting journalists to come and learn what it is like to be a Subaru owner. Driving down desert roads, rock climbing, and visiting beautiful national parks is all apart of what Subaru owners love. The one thing missing was a dog in the back of each car for the participants! The Subaru Legacy was featured during this lifestyle campaign for the journalists to drive and experience.

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Journalists from all over the country came to Joshua Tree National Park to test out the Legacy and live the Subaru lifestyle. The participants got to go climbing with a local guide company and test themselves on the cliffs. As Subaru/Leave No Trace Traveling Trainers we were on site to explain the important partnership Subaru has in supporting Leave No Trace and lead participants on a hike. As we hiked through the desert, we loved seeing the excitement on the participants’ faces as they took pictures of the rocks, Joshua trees, and the climbers scaling the cliffs all around us.

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As Subaru/Leave No Trace Traveling Trainers we get to have this experience year round. We camp over 200 nights a year out of our Subaru Crosstrek Hybrid, visit national parks, and climb/paddle all over the country. We love meeting other Subaru owners and hearing what they love most about their Subaru. Some people tell us how confident they feel driving it, how reliable they are, how easy to maintain they can be, but the most common conversations we have with Subaru owners is where their Subaru brings them. Driving over snowy mountain passes to go skiing, using their Subaru to get tot the put-in for paddling, or exploring a backcountry road to find the crag they want to climb at. Subaru fits in wells as are title sponsor for the Subaru/Leave No Trace Traveling Trainers program because of how responsible they are as a company.    

Thanks for reading and remember to be like Bigfoot and Leave No Trace!

Pat and TJ

Leave No Trace’s Patrick and Theresa Beezley are part of the 2015 Subaru/Leave No Trace Traveling Trainer Program that provides free, mobile education to communities across the country. Proud partners of this program include Subaru of America, Coleman, Hi-Cone, and Smartwool.

Feb 17, 2015

San Diego, CA: Read the Top 10 Ways to Reduce Your Impact in the Outdoors!

1.     Prepare for your trip.

a.     Bring the ten essentials.

b.     Research the weather.

c.      Know the rules and regulations of the area you are traveling in.

d.     Obtain any permits or reservations needed for the area your traveling to.

2.     Stay in the middle of the trail. Even if the trail is muddy, just hike through the mud. By hiking through the mud you won’t erode the sides of the trail or crush vegetation on the side of the trail. Wear boots and if you need them bring along gaiters. If you are not hiking on a trail, hike on durable surfaces.

3.     Pack out your trash.

a.     Carry a trash bag on every hike.

b.     Consider packing out other trash that you find. 

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4.     Control your dog.

a.     Pick up after your dog

b.     Don’t let your dog chase wildlife

c.      Don’t let your dog impact other visitors.

5.     Bury or pack out your solid human waste.

a.     Bring along trowel, toilet paper, and a zip lock bag (for packing out the used toilet paper).

b.     Know the rules and regulations of the area you are camping.

c.      Carry along human waste disposal bag if it’s required.

d.     For solid human waste go 200 feet and for liquid human waste go 100 feet from trail, waters, and other campsites.

6.     Leaving your mark is overrated. Take pictures instead of taking items or marking on trees, rocks, or other surfaces.

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7.     Enjoy your campfire responsibly.

a.     Research if fires are allowed.

b.     Don’t build fires next to boulders or under rock overhangs.

c.      Consider using an established fire ring, mound fire, or a fire pan.

d.     Use the four D’s for fire wood collection.

       i.     Dead- Only use dead wood.

       ii.     Down- Don’t break branches off of trees.

       iii.     Dinky- Wood no bigger than your forearm.

       iv.     Distant- Go far from your camp to collect wood.

8.     Keep wildlife wild.

a.     Secure your food and trash from wildlife.

b.     Stay a safe distance from wildlife.

c.      Research what types of animals are in the area you are traveling and what requirements are expected (Ex. Are bear hang or bear canisters required).

9.     Use the yield triangle and keep your noise level down so you don’t bother other visitors.

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10. Teach others about Leave No Trace!

Thanks for reading and remember to be like Bigfoot and Leave No Trace!

Pat and TJ

Leave No Trace’s Patrick and Theresa Beezley are part of the 2015 Subaru/Leave No Trace Traveling Trainer Program that provides free, mobile education to communities across the country. Proud partners of this program include Subaru of America, Coleman, Hi-Cone, and Smartwool.

Feb 12, 2015

Tucson, AZ: Saguaro National Park and the greater Tucson area are facing the aggressive invasive plant species, buffelgrass. Find out how this plant is altering the desert landscape and what visitors to the area can do to help!

To find out how you can get involved at Saguaro National Park with buffelgrass removal events, visit their site for more information.

Until next time,

Court and Nick
 

Leave No Trace’s Courtney and Nick Bierschbach are part of the 2015 Subaru/Leave No Trace Traveling Trainer Program that provides free, mobile education to communities across the country. Proud partners of this program include Subaru of America, Coleman, Hi-Cone, and Smartwool.

Feb 12, 2015

Ogden, UT: Snow is covering the country! It is time to get out the skis, snowboards, and snowshoes to go out and enjoy the resorts and backcountry areas we love. Whether it is a day at your local slopes or a backcounty trip spent skiing to a hut there are always Leave No Trace considerations to keep in mind. So when you spend time outside in the winter remember how the Leave No Trace principles can help you out there. Use our 14 points to minimize your impact this winter. 

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  1. Check snow conditions and the weather before going on you trip.
  2. Check with land managers about high risk areas and regulations.
  3. Educate yourself about traveling and camping in the backcountry. Carry an avalanche beacon, probe, and shovel.
  4. Stay on deep snow whenever possible and in muddy spring conditions try to stay in either the middle of the trail or on snow.
  5. Avoid avalanche routes, cornices, and unstable snow.
  6. Consult your map to make sure that you are camping 200 feet away from water.
  7. Pack it in pack it out. Pick up litter, food scraps, and wax shavings.
  8. Pack out solid human waste. If you are unable to pack it out, bury it in a snow cathole 200 feet away from trails and water sources.
  9. When leaving camp dismantle windbreaks, snow caves, and igloos. 
  10. Keep loud voices and sounds to a minimum.
  11. Share the trail and yield to downhill and faster users.
  12. Separate ski and snowshoe tracks. Avoid hiking on ski or snowshoe tracks.
  13. Observe wildlife from a distance and never approach them.
  14. Control your pets and follow leash rules.

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Thanks for reading and remember to be like Bigfoot and Leave No Trace!

Pat and TJ

Leave No Trace’s Patrick and Theresa Beezley are part of the 2015 Subaru/Leave No Trace Traveling Trainer Program that provides free, mobile education to communities across the country. Proud partners of this program include Subaru of America, Coleman, Hi-Cone, and Smartwool.

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